Four Case Studies on Substandard Rental Housing, Hundreds of Families

(Courtesy of the Granite State Organizing Project, 2012 NCHH Grassroots Advocacy Network grantees.)

In A Report on Substandard Housing Conditions, the Granite State Organizing Project has chosen to focus on a few local property owners who own a substantial number of rental units. Together they control hundreds of apartment units in Manchester, NH.

(Note: Full documentation of building inspections, violations, and complaints for the following case studies are in the report appendix. All information in the case studies is from the City of Manchester Planning and Community Development Department, Office of Building Regulations (PCDD-B); the Manchester tax collector’s office; the Manchester Online Assessment Database at Vision Appraisal online; and the New Hampshire Secretary of State Business look-up site.)

Case Study One: MPBUH Holdings LLC; Fair Deal Enterprises, Inc.; 2MJ5 Holdings, LLC; and Mohamed Mobeen

Mr. Mobeen controls at least 120 rental units in Manchester under his own name and through various corporations and trusts including MPBUH Holdings LLC, Fair Deal Enterprises, Inc, and 2MJ5 Holdings, LLC.

Mr. Mobeen also owns the Welcome Home rooming house at 286 Concord Street, for which he owes the city $61,713.35 in back taxes, according to the City of Manchester Tax Collector’s Office.

161/163/165 Concord Street, Manchester, NH (MPBUH Holdings LLC)
There are 21 units. According to PCDD-B files, this building has had a problem with flaking and peeling paint since 1988, when the City began keeping records. Despite the fact that a child was found to have elevated lead levels in July 2012 while living in this building, the peeling and flaking paint is still a problem, as we discovered on a visit in December 2013 and again in March 2014.

According to the PCDD-B inspection files, apartments continue to be rented without functioning smoke detectors. According to PCDD-B files, the drop ceiling tiles are replaced in some units every few years, yet the root cause of the leak is seemingly not addressed, as the leaking shows up in numerous inspections and in tenant complaints.

144-158 Lake Avenue, Manchester, NH (MPBUH Holdings LLC)
There are 21 units in this building. City records also show that the building has needed screens and storm windows since 2009. Records also show that the building has been infested with cockroaches since 2000.

Case Study Two: Perdue Properties, Inc.

Perdue Properties Inc. is owned by Mr. Scott Perdue. He controls at least 50 rental units under his own name and the company name.

197-207 Wilson Street, Manchester, NH (Perdue Properties, Inc.)
There are seven units. The building has a history of a water leak that dates back to 1996, when the file shows the first mention of a leaky second floor bathroom. A tenant complaint dated January 2014 concerns the leak from the second floor bathroom. The tenant claims that the landlord has people come in and switch the ceiling tiles, but the leaking problem continues.

A visit to the property on March 24, 2014, confirmed that despite having been awarded the CoC as recently at February 20, 2014, the ceiling problem had still not been addressed, and the unit lacked carbon monoxide detectors that are required by law.

Note: As of early March 2014, Perdue Properties, Inc. owed the city $49,094.44 in back taxes on this building, according to the City of Manchester Tax Collector’s Office.

267-273 Cedar Street, Manchester, NH (Perdue Properties, Inc.)
This is a nine-unit dwelling. According to PCDD-B files, this building has a history of unaddressed leaks and insect infestations. The cockroach and bedbug infestations have caused tenant complaints dating back to 2010.

Note: As of early March 2014, Scott Perdue owed the City $35,970.21 in back taxes on this building, according to the City of Manchester’s Tax Collector’s Office.

Case Study Three: Donald T. Jsirandanis

Mr. Jsirandanis controls at least 50 rental units in the city of Manchester as Jsirandanis, DT Living Trust; Jsirandanis Donald T. L VG T; Jsirandanis, Donald T; or Jsirandanis, Donald.

461 Maple Street, Manchester, NH (Jsirandanis, Donald T.)
This building consists of 18 units. PCDD-B files point to a history of water leaks and a lack of functioning smoke detectors. There is peeling paint inside and outside the building. As of visits paid in March of 2014, children live in this building.

325 Amherst Street, Manchester, NH (Jsirandanis, Donald T.)
According to PCDD-B files, this building has history of unaddressed water leaks, peeling paint and insect infestation. As of visits in March of 2014, families with children occupy apartments in this building, exposing them to possible health impacts.

Case Study Four: Formosa Co. LLC

Formosa also does business as Formosa Investments, LLC. Formosa controls at least 100 units in Manchester.

215 Wilson Street, Manchester, NH (Formosa Co. LLC)
This is a six-unit building. According to PCDD-B files, this building has a history of recurring leaks, electrical problems, and insect infestations (cockroaches and bed bugs) so severe it was referred to the Health Department in 2006. As of visits in March 2014, insects continue to be a problem, and families with children live in this building.

215 Lake Avenue, Manchester, NH (Formosa Co. LLC)
This is a 10-unit building that also houses the Formosa office. According to PCDD-B files, this building has a history of ceilings showing water damage, resulting in violations every three years at the time of the CoC inspection. The PCDD-B files note a fire in February 2005. The inspectors note that the smoke detectors always seem to need replacing. The building has a history of cockroach infestations, and an inspection by the City in October 2010 showed signs of rodents as well. A CoC was issued in 2011, but there is no receipt in the file for extermination related to the 2010 inspection. As of our last visit in March of 2014, families with children live here.

Each of these buildings has a long history of dilapidation and neglect. They were bought as neglected properties, and that is the condition in which they remain. Each of the current owners has seemingly done only the bare minimum of upkeep required to get a CoC.