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Federal Appropriations - FY17

Update
The National Safe and Healthy Housing Coalition’s sign-on letter to Congress for federal lead poisoning prevention funding increases was recently sent to over 200 Hill staff. This year's letter had over 140 signatories, and it's not too late to add more. We'll be reposting the letter online with new signatories periodically and re-sending it to the Hill in the fall. Click here to sign on today! 

Additionally, 75 representatives signed on to Representative Slaughter and Representative Cicilline’s letter to increase funding for lead poisoning prevention. Click here to see their letter and find out if your representative signed on this year.

On the Senate side, 24 senators signed on to Senator Reed’s and/or Senator Shaheen’s letters to increase funding for lead poisoning prevention. Click here to see Senator Reed’s letter, and/or click here for Senator Shaheen’s letter to find out if your senators signed on this year.

Need some additional information to help educate your senator(s) and/or representative(s) about healthy housing issues in your state? Click here to access our State-Specific Healthy Housing Fact Sheets. These fact sheets contain a wealth of healthy housing-related information and statistics useful to advocates nationwide.


Background

The charts below show the National Safe and Healthy Housing Coalition's FY17 funding requests for lead poisoning prevention, lead hazard control, and healthy homes.

Increasing the CDC Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Program to $35 million will allow CDC to provide grants in all 50 states for surveillance to determine the extent of childhood lead poisoning, educate the public and healthcare providers about lead poisoning, and ensure that lead-exposed children receive needed medical and environmental follow-up services. Increasing CDC’s asthma control program to $30.5 million will provide funding for programs in three additional states.

We also call for increasing HUD’s Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes program to $230 million annually over 10 years. This is the amount the Presidential Task Force on Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks to Children recommended in its Federal Strategy Targeting Lead Paint Hazards. Specifically, $230 million over 10 years will provide lead hazard screening and lead hazard control of pre-1960 housing occupied by low-income families. (See page 5 of the Presidential Task Force recommendations.)











Federal Appropriations - FY16

In December 2015, Congress and the President enacted the final spending package for FY16 (Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016).

Due to NSHHC advocacy pushing throughout 2015 for level and increased funding and our Policy Working Group specifically developing report language recommendations:

  • The omnibus provides level funding for HUD's Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes at $110 million in FY 2016, despite the House voting earlier this year to cut the budget by 1/3.
  • The omnibus INCREASES funding for CDC's Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention program by $1.5 million to $17 million, its highest level since 2012.  While we had advocated for a restoration of the full pre-2012 level of $29 million, this is a great step in the right direction.
  • The omnibus also increases funding for CDC's Asthma Control Program, which the National Safe and Healthy Housing Coalition supports, by $1.5 million to $29 million.
  • The bill's report language calls for HUD to implement a single inspection protocol for both public housing and Section 8 voucher (HCV) units.  Currently, the housing quality standards are much higher for public housing so this will benefit the residents of Section 8 voucher program.  An earlier report which is still in effect called for HUD to report to Congress in 90 days on a plan for updating the HCV standards and its timeline for a single inspection protocol.
  • An earlier appropriations bill report, still in effect, states:  "CDC is encouraged to continue to support health housing activities."   

Click here for more details on Congressional action for healthy homes funding during the 2016 appropriations process.

Background

In December 2015, Congress and the President enacted the final spending package for FY16 (Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016).


CDC Healthy Homes/Lead Poisoning Prevention (Enrolled for FY16: $17 million)
The FY 2016 President's budget request for CDC included $15.522 million for this program (see page 285), including $13 million from the Prevention and Public Health Fund, level with FY14 and FY15. The proposed budget indicated that CDC will fund state lead poisoning prevention programs, advise state and local agencies and stakeholders in lead poisoning prevention, provide epidemiological and laboratory expertise, and monitor trends in childhood blood lead levels for states that provide data. CDC would fund approximately 35 state and local health departments through three-year competitive cooperative agreements. States and cities would use CDC funding to enhance local surveillance capacity to help guide appropriate management of children identified with high blood lead levels. States and cities would also be funded to identify remaining at-risk geographic areas and implement population-based primary prevention interventions (e.g., housing rehabilitation, enforcement of housing and health codes, and early childhood and other educational activities).

The final Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015 provided $17 million, of which the entire $17 million is from the Prevention and Public Health Fund.

For the full Committee Report on the Labor, HHS, and Education portion of the Omnibus, including a detailed funding table, please visit: http://1.usa.gov/1I93mds

EPA Radon Program, Grants to States (Enrolled for FY16: $8 million)
The FY 2016 President's budget request for EPA again proposed to eliminate these grants under the theory that the program that has achieved significant progress over the 24 years of its existence in mitigating radon exposure and building capacity at the local and state government level to continue radon protection efforts without federal support. (See the FY 16 request for additional detail.)

The final Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016 provided $8 million for grants to states for radon.

For the full Committee Report on the Interior and Environment portion of the Omnibus, including a detailed funding table, please visit: http://1.usa.gov/1O66CTd

HUD Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control (Final for FY15: $110 million)
The FY 2016 President's budget request for HUD requested a total of $120 million for the Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control programs, including the following budget components:

  • Lead Hazard Control Program: $93 million;
  • Healthy Homes Program: $25 million; and
  • Healthy Lead Technical Studies and Programmatic Support: $2 million.

The final Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015 provided $110 million total, including $20 million for healthy homes.

For the full Committee Report on the Transportation, Housing and Urban Development portion of the Omnibus, including a detailed funding table, please visit: http://1.usa.gov/1mo3Wu1


Forty-three members of Congress pressed for increased funding for 2016:
Led by Senator Jack Reed, Senator Jeanne Shaheen, Representative Louise Slaughter, and Representative David Cicilline, members of Congress wrote in March 2015 to the Senate and House appropriations subcommittees to urge the following FY16 funding levels:

  • $29 million for CDC’s Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Program
  • $120 million for HUD’s Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes

See their letters:  

CDC HUD Healthy Homes Lead Poisoning Prevention FY16 Appropriations Letter (House) 
CDC Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention FY16 Appropriations Letter (Senate) 
HUD Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes FY16 Appropriations Letter (Senate)


HUD and CDC Lead Appropriations: 1996 - Present